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Hope to continue 'Twilight' series even without books: Director
IANS  [ Wed, Oct 10, 2012 ]
           
  • Los Angeles, Oct 10 (IANS) The much loved vampire love story is nearing its end with the release of the "Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2". However, director Bill Condon hopes to continue the series, even if there are no books left to adapt.

    "It is one of the most successful movie franchises that have run out of books to adapt. However, this may not be an obstacle for the 'Twilight' films. The movie is expected to gross $700 million plus worldwide in revenues," Condon said in an email interaction.

    "It's hard to imagine a movie that does $700 million plus doesn't have ongoing value. We are contemplating about continuing the series even though there are no books to adapt to," he added.

    The first film of the "Twilight" series was released in 2008, which instantly catapulted actors Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart to star status.

    And Condon is confident that "...Breaking Dawn Part 2" will be as successful as the previous "Twilight" films.

    "I am positive that it will be huge success and will fair equal, if not more, compared to the previous three parts," he said.

    "In fact, the whole crew is excited to see the response we get from the audience and more so from the people who have read the book and come to watch the movie. We just can't wait for the movie to release," he added.

    The film is in the final stages of post-production, which Condon says is the most complicated part of filmmaking process.

    The film will have its worldwide release Nov 16 and it will hit Indian screens a week later Nov 23. It is being released here by PVR Pictures.

    He said they are at the stage of mixing and doing colour timing, "and adding that last big bunch of visual effects shots, and that's where it gets complicated because the (most challenging) ones always come in last, so it's just making sure that they look as good as they can, that's the big thing right now."

    "I feel like it's the biggest musical number I've ever directed. It does feel, when you finally get the rhythm of that right, it makes it, I hope, very satisfying," he added.


           



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