Boss Bollywood.hindi/boss/4436/www.nowrunning.com/movie/12248/bollywood.hindi Movie Review

Feature Film
Despite being an age-old cinema, Akshay Kumar's Boss will find its takers among the ones who have been making films like Chennai Express record-breaking hits. The movie for the others will prove to be highly mediocre.
  Average
Oct 16, 2013 By Mansha Rastogi

Filmmaker Anthony D'Souza, who made the mammoth debacle Blue, marks his comeback to cinema with a safe zone of 'South remakes' where one doesn't really have much direction than just shoving all the filmy masala into one film. Boss, the official remake of South film Pokkiri Raja, has all ingredients of over the top fight sequences, melodrama, romance and song-dance that place it in the current crop of leave-your-brains-at-home films but despite being formulaic the film manages to entertain only in parts.


A righteous proponent of Gandhian values like non-violence, Satyakant (Mithun Chakraborty) finds a deviant in his own house, his son Surya. After reproaching him enough and trying failingly to mend his ways, Satyakant eventually disowns Surya. Dejected by his own father Surya gets under local goon Big Boss' (Danny Denzongpa) wings to learn the tricks and trade of his illegal business. Years pass and Surya turns into Boss (Akshay Kumar), a fearless thug who would kidnap or extort money from people on contractual basis. Little does his know that his own father would come one day giving him the contract to save his second son Shiv (Shiv Pandit) who is being wrongly framed by ministers and cop Ayushman Thakur (Ronit Roy) for falling in love with Ayushman's sister Ankita (Aditi Rao Hydari). How Boss reunites with his family and fights with the cop head-on is what follows through the rest of the plot.


Boss, typically so, isn't a story with lots of action; it is a film on action with little story slipped between the plenty fight sequences just to make it palatable. It's quite an apology when the story becomes just a formality in a film to weaves together masala sequences. Similar is a case of Boss which is nothing but piecing together cinema of the '90s of Gandhian father, rebellious son, the emotions, the romance and the villains.


Respite comes in Boss in the name of comedy. Although one can't say it's a laugh riot all the way, Boss still has its moments especially in the first half where some of the gags really make you chuckle. However, they too are very sparse in this action-comedy.


Akshay Kumar easily slips into the role of Boss and is entertaining too with his mannerisms. Talented newcomer Shiv Pandit who was last seen in Shaitan totally sells himself off to the commercial demands and lands himself in a highly insignificant role in a massy entertainer. The film doesn't do justice to the talent that he possesses. Aditi Rao Hydari too enjoys her time of just looking pretty, donning bikini and dancing on exotic locations to romantic numbers.


Both Danny Denzongpa and Mithun Chakraborty earnestly play their parts in this formula film and add some weight to the plots with their portrayals.


The man who deserves to be lauded the most is Ronit Roy who turns out to be brilliant as the evil villain. A refreshing change from the staple Prakash Raj, Ronit Roy gives some of the brilliant action sequences towards the climax and makes the fight between the hero and villain more entertaining.


Despite being an age-old cinema, Akshay Kumar's Boss will find its takers among the ones who have been making films like Chennai Express record-breaking hits. The movie for the others will prove to be highly mediocre.

  Average
Mansha Rastogi

   

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