Lucifer Malayalam Movie Review

Feature Film | U | Drama | 2h 48min
'Lucifer' hardly boasts of any out-of-the-box factor in the story that mainly focuses on a political family. The loyal saviour, as usual, the protagonist, timely steps in to rescue the family in crisis. In his directorial debut, Prithviraj with full of admiration embraces a stylish narration to make the content glossy.
Mar 28, 2019 By K. R. Rejeesh

In the garb of a first-time director, actor Prithviraj Sukumaran hankers after fulfilling the creative interests of Mohanlal fans in style. His passionate narration is powerful and it eventually eclipses the regular tale of 'Lucifer'. The pace with which the tale moves ahead initially before drenching all with showers of engaging feel is enough to grab the eyeballs. While satiating the excitement in the form of intense shots, the film takes a descending path later derailing effect of the substance.


'Lucifer' begins with the death of Chief Minister PK Ramdas aka PKR (Sachin Khedekar), who leaves behind his daughter Priyadarshini (Manju Warrier) and son Jathin Ramdas (Tovino Thomas). Priyadarshini's second husband Bobby alias Bimal Nair (Vivek Oberoi) interferes in the affairs of IUF party by offering to fund from a pharmaceutical company based in Mumbai. Ignoring senior leader Mahesha Varma (Saikumar), Bobby takes control of the party by revising the list of election candidates. He launches Jathin as Chief Minister candidate in the polls.


Meanwhile, in her family, Priyadarshini tries to mend her relationship with her daughter Jhanvi, played by Sania Iyyappan. For Priyadarshini, Stephan Nedumpally (Mohanlal), who is brought up by PKR, appears to be an annoying person in her life. Indrajith Sukumaran plays Govardhan, a social media activist, who brings to light the secrets of Bobby.


Murali Gopy's script explores how money flows into politics and the shenanigans behind it. Lambast against media and politicians is rife in the plot, which is tinged with succinct dialogues. Through the characters of Aloshi (Kalabhavan Shajohn) and Murugan (Baiju Santhosh), the writer reveals the low level of scheming and conspiracies. Yet 'Lucifer' leans towards the regular formulaic side at its decisive juncture, thus acquiring traits of anticipation.


Bobby with the aid of Abdul (Suresh Chandra Menon) enters into a verbal contract with a group in Mumbai for raising funds for the party. Interestingly, Stephen battles against the evil powers with his pulverising activities, and no wonder, it is the result of his words turning into deeds: "The battle is between vice and vice." Mohanlal as Stephen Nedumpally is calm and composed while Manju Warrier neatly conveys the pangs and anxieties of a mother as well as a daughter.


'Lucifer' hardly boasts of any out-of-the-box factor in the story that mainly focuses on a political family. The loyal saviour, as usual, the protagonist, timely steps in to rescue the family in crisis. In his directorial debut, Prithviraj with full of admiration embraces a stylish narration to make the content glossy.


Vivek Oberoi is meticulously eloquent with his malicious intents, and of course, the voice lent by actor Vineeth plays a big part in it. Prithvi successfully goes unbridled in the haute presentation of Stephen sustaining the same ecstasy till the end.


Visuals by Sujith Vaassudev are supremely enthralling and close-up shots play a vital part in the movie. Deepak Dev provides an apt background score that effectively traverses the scenes.

K. R. Rejeesh

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