Hawaizaada Hindi Movie Review

Feature Film | U
Lost in Translation is what best describes Hawaizaada best. What started off as a biopic turns into a sobbing love tale that you wouldn't want to watch. Read up on the scientist instead.
Jan 30, 2015 By Mansha Rastogi

It's ordinary (or so it seems now) to take a great plot and make an equally great film. What's talent (redefined and taken to another level) is how you take a potentially hit film and bring it down to ruins. Yes, you have got to give it to filmmaker Vibhu Puri to take up a never seen before plot, that of Shivkar Bapuji Talpade, the first Indian scientist credited to have constructed the first unmanned plane, and reduces it to a yawn-fest where you wish the film just ended PRONTO!


Shivkar Talpade or Shivi (Ayushmann Khurrana) is a no more than a loser. He failed 8th grade, eight times and whiles his time away doing nothing creative. His family, a respected one at that, is highly pissed with his less than adequate mannerisms that don't befit an esteemed household. To add salt to the wound, he falls head over heels in love with a show girl or dancer Sitara Devi (Pallavi Sharda). And the next thing? He is thrown out of his house. He then seeks shelter in an eccentric Shastriji's (Mithun Chakroborty) abode and coaxes him to help him make the first aircraft. But Shivi is too engrossed in loving Sitara to care for the flight to freedom. But when she unceremoniously dumps him, Shivi decides to join hands with Shastriji. But can a school dropout make an aircraft? Watch the movie, if you must, to find that out!


Hawaizaada's merit lies only and only in unearthing a historical legend as that of Shivkar Talpade who created the first unmanned aircraft, possibly a decade before the Wright brothers. But that's it. All merit ends there and what starts is an excrutiatingly 153 minute lo-oooo-ng tiring journey of a man cucooned in a Sawariyaa look-a-alike world replete with maniacal, loud mouthed, over the top characters.


Biopics are not new to the filmdom. In fact, if not for anything, only over exploited in the current times what with all the Bhaag Milkha Bhaag and Mary Koms. Filmmaker Vibhu Puri also takes the plunge into the same but sadly, bites the dust. Based on the life and times of a great scientist, Hawaizaada looks more like a broadway musical rather than a biopic. The movie has songs cropping every now and then, each worse than the other.


And if that isn't enough of the grief, the extremely elaborate set design, which can even put Sanjay Leela Bhansali to shame. It's still a huge question why would anybody want to splurge so extravagantly into set design while all they could do was get a good script writer.


As mentioned above, the actors take great pride in over acting in this film. Bunch of imbeciles would be an apt term for all of them. While Ayushmann appears busy making faces, Pallavi Sharda stutters to deliver a straight faced dialogue. The least said about the acting legend Mithun Chakraborty the better. While on one side he still manages to pull off great character roles, here in Hawaizaada, his part of an eccentric scientist is so garish and badly done, it makes you want to bawl.


To sum it up, Lost in Translation is what best describes Hawaizaada best. What started of as a biopic turns into a sobbing love tale that you wouldn't want to watch. Read up on the scientist instead.


Mansha Rastogi

   

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