Chandrettan Evideya Malayalam Movie Review

Perhaps it's our expectations regarding 'Chandrettan Evideya' that amplify our disappointment. Dunno whether it has all be pre-written as the movie claims to be, but looks like this is an earnest exercise that falls all flat.
Rating: 50%
May 3, 2015 By Veeyen

'Chandrettan Evideya' is a film that cannot claim uniqueness when it comes to its theme. Well intentioned perhaps, but never really reaching the cinematic heights that it aspires to touch, this film lacks the emotional impact that it so desperately needs.


Chandramohan (Dileep) works at the Legislative Assembly at the capital city, while his wife Sushama (Anusree) has been posted at Thrissur. Chandrettan, as he is fondly addressed by his wife, is a classical dance enthusiast and a renowned arts columnist as well. When Geethanjali (Namitha Pramod), a lady doctor by profession and a danseuse by passion drops by to seek a favour, the romantic in Chandramohan usurps the family man in him, and in no time Sushama senses something burning in the air.


After his directorial debut that had left me all floored, 'Chandrettan Evideya' is a downer from Siddharth Bharathan, in that the notion of an extramarital relationship and its consequences are never really explored to its fullest potential in it. On the other hand it peripherally flits over the issue in a slapdash manner, making a few sweeping statements that have little significance.


The film does display a staunch belief in Naadi Jyothisham, and Sushama confirms in the climax, that she is just a helpless soul who can do little to change what sage Agasthya has already written a few thousand years back. Chandramohan soon starts having visions of his previous birth, and steadfastly believes that Geethanjali is a reincarnation of his lover from another era, Vasanthamallika.


Of the three major roles in the film, Geethanjali looks and sounds the most confusing. She certainly isn't sure as to what she wants from this very special relationship that she shares with Chandramohan, and confesses that she doesn't know whom she is to him, when confronted by Sushama.


This vagueness does spread over the rest of the film as well, though it becomes quite obvious that it's only a matter of time before the erring husband realizes his folly. It takes the cry of a child for him to realize that he has gone wrong; strange perhaps that he had chosen to ignore the charming antics of his young son back home.


The humor in the film is its saving grace, and the film does have some light moments to its credit. But there are ample senseless digressions as well that rob the fun away from the proceedings, like the interactions between Chandramohan and his previous incarnation.


'Chandrettan Evideya' belongs to Anusree, who stresses even further that she is a tremendous actor who could give her contemporaries a run for their money. In fact, all the other actors in 'Chandrettan Evideya' pale in comparison to her, and the climax that is a perfectly rolled out cliche looks believable, solely because of her.


Dileep delivers a credible performance as Chandrettan, while Namitha is aptly cast as well. There is also a real wonderful feat from young actor Soubin Shahir who appears in the role of Sumesh, and Mukesh and Suraj Venjarammoodu are simply adequate.


Perhaps it's our expectations regarding 'Chandrettan Evideya' that amplify our disappointment. Dunno whether it has all be pre-written as the movie claims to be, but looks like this is an earnest exercise that falls all flat.


Rating: 50%
Veeyen

   

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