School Bus Malayalam Movie Review

Feature Film | U
'School Bus' does have a few relatable statements to make on the art of parenting. Beyond that it has zilch to offer. Destabilized by the flimsiest script as yet from Bobby and Sanjay, this one is indeed a rutted ride that will leave you all shaken up, sadly for the wrong reasons.
May 28, 2016 By Veeyen

Roshan Andrews steers his 'School Bus' along an appealing path for almost an hour, and then watches powerlessly as the brakes fail and the bus hurtles along proverbial lanes before crashing in headlong onto a dead end. Hardly does a film disappoint this much after an alluring and realistic former half as 'School Bus' does, and the disgruntlement hence is harsher than ever.


Ajoy (Akash) and Anju (Angelina) are students at the Trinity International School, while their affluent parents Joseph (Jayasurya) and Aparna (Aparna Gopinath) are busy building worlds of their own. A mischief lands Ajoy in trouble, who fearing his dad's wrath flees from home and school. A young police officer (Kunchacko Boban) is entrusted with the case, and he sets out on his task, even as the parents strive hard to discover where they had gone wrong.


As much as I remain an admirer of some of the best scripts that have been penned by the Bobby - Sanjay duo, I couldn't help but let out a sigh at how their 'School Bus' script barges into the forest and gets lost in there. It's obvious that this aint no Jungle Book and as the film forays into the jungle, I wouldn't blame the director either for having lost the reins in the latter half.


It goes without saying that films as these eventually end up focussing on the parents rather than the kids themselves, and 'School Bus' is no exception. Which is why, what starts off with the charm of a kids' film, assumes a thriller tone after almost an hour, and thereafter lazily engages in a done and redone debate on new age parenting.


As the parents take it up, 'School Bus' loses its charm totally, and passes through highly fake and often predictable situations. The climax of the film is a very easy compromise that yet again thwarts your hopes and makes you think of the umpteen possible denouements that could have made a huge difference.


One would think there simply can't be an overdoing when it comes to graphics, and 'School Bus' proves you wrong. While most of the visual effects inside the jungle have been crafted pretty well, there are at least a couple of occasions when an overdose of it makes you wish they had gone a little less pushy on it perhaps.


'School Bus' without doubt belongs to the two child performers - Akash and Angelina - who effortlessly carry the film on their petite shoulders. The elder ones do pale in comparison, though Jayasurya and Aparna, the two ever dependable actors hold their ground with aplomb. Kunchacko Boban and his strangely off the mark performance does however come across as a shocker.


C K Muraleedharan is at his very best in 'School Bus' and presents an array of fabulous frames that turn the film into a visual delight. The makers have been kind enough to keep senseless songs out of the narrative, and the background score by Gopi Sundar is quite remarkable as well.


'School Bus' does have a few relatable statements to make on the art of parenting. Beyond that it has zilch to offer. Destabilized by the flimsiest script as yet from Bobby and Sanjay, this one is indeed a rutted ride that will leave you all shaken up, sadly for the wrong reasons.


Veeyen

   

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