Achayans Malayalam Movie Review

Feature Film | U | Comedy, Thriller
The journey of 'Achayans' through the familiar terrains is hardly appreciable. As the derailment happens right from the off, the prominent part of the film peters out without making any impact. It's too late for the revival!
May 20, 2017 By K. R. Rejeesh

If you see the tagline of the film, "celebrations unlimited," well, you are prepared for it. But here, what defines celebrations is boozing and women. Once the action begins, you would start to frown upon it as you realise that fun can't be at the expense of distasteful scenes and dialogues.


In the film "Cousins", writer Sethu presented the journey of four youths and their subsequent meeting of two girls that leads to the central plot of the film. In "Achayans", a four-member gang set off their pleasure trip before the marriage of Tony (Unni Mukundan), an alcoholic, with Jessica (Sshivada). His close relative Roy Abraham Mathew (Jayaram) takes them to different places to unwind themselves. At a bar, they bump into two girls-- Reetha (Amala Paul) and Prayaga (Anu Sithara). Later, a murder in their hotel during a New Year party leaves all of them in trouble.


Director Kannan Thamarakulam narrates the carefree life of Tony and Roy at the outset. While unfolding the ensuing events, he seems to be perplexed in the narration because the trite screenplay gums up his creative wits. Going by the storyline, the writer has intended for a comic-thriller but the plot seldom whips up your curiosity and creates the suspense. Kannan tries to make the most of the 'aura' of the stars, including Jayaram and Prakash Raj, and embellish their presence with blaring BGM.


In fact, the film gets a lifeline with the appearance of Karthik Viswanath (Prakash Raj), whose mien and demeanor as an investigative officer are noteworthy. Unni Mukundan's Tony is too far from expressing his emotions. Interestingly, in portraying characters, actresses excel their male counterparts in the film.


Meanwhile, unlike Jayaram, who has hardly anything to perform, it's Amala Paul, who grabs the eyeballs towards the end. Her portrayal of a bizarre possessive girl is convincing and apt.


The journey of "Achayans" through the familiar terrains is hardly appreciable. As the derailment happens right from the off, the prominent part of the film peters out without making an impact. It's too late for the revival!


K. R. Rejeesh

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