Kala Viplavam Pranayam Malayalam Movie Review

Feature Film | Drama
Critics:
Audience:
A pale imitation of campus films based on Left-wing ideology, this film is devoid of a solid plot. There is smidge of romance and revolution to justify the title but no trace of art.
Feb 25, 2018 By K. R. Rejeesh

The knock-on effect of campus politics films released last year is evident in "Kala Viplavam Pranayam." Here too, romance is a staple of Communism. But there is no real resonance of these two factors in the narration. Jithin Jithu, who makes his debut as a director, conceives the film for mere celebration of the exuberance of youth. However, he fails to give any insight into the tale.


With the aim of marrying Greeshma (Gayathri Suresh) and owning a bullet, Jayan (Anson Paul) leads the romantic part while Ravi (Santhosh Keezhattoor) fulfils the political side. The story of Nandhan (Vineeth Viswam) and his beloved Ayisha (Niranjana Anoop) extends the thread of romance but it never seems to be interesting.


The portrayal of Jayan and his friends, including Ramesh (Saiju Kurup) and the format of their friendship lack novelty to whip up any sort of excitement. The screenplay written by Aashiq Akbar Ali is sloppy and flounders to take forward the proceedings. There is room for improvisation in all areas but the writer shies away from taking such an effort. The creative inputs are mediocre while supporting actors like Indrans are impressive than the rest of the cast.


The conflict of Jayan is nothing new considering the common trait of the heroes in such flicks. Anson Paul struggles to get his emotions right to turn the strides in his favour. The significance of the character is fading once the focus shifts to glorifying the party.


The depth of the director's creative commitment is a big question when you analyse the effort. It's simply a pale imitation of campus films based on Left-wing ideology. Without a solid plot, the target is missed by a long mile. There is smidge of romance and revolution to justify the title but no trace of art.

K. R. Rejeesh

   

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