Aravindante Athidhikal Review

Though predictable and trite, this film is elevated by the soul of the emotional bond between a son and a mother. 'Aravindante Athidhikal' has a feel good feel throughout and it starts as light and innocuous fun before heading to the sentimental conflict zone. (2.5) (K. R. Rejeesh)



Director M. Mohanan's latest outing once again underlines that he is an exponent of family drama. "Aravindante Athidhikal" carries the emotional layer of mother-son relationship that obviously turned out to be the soul of the film. Like his earlier flicks, Mohanan begins the narration accompanied by light and innocuous fun before heading to the sentimental conflict zone. At a glance, it's a predictable and trite storyline but he deftly creates the freshness with the settings at Mookambika Temple, Kollur.


Young Aravindan, played by Vineeth Sreenivasan, is working in a lodge owned by Madhavan (Sreenivasan) near Mookambika temple. Though an orphan, Aravindan is loved by all in that street due to his amiable character and also for the reason that he was deserted by his mother at the temple when he was a boy. Once Girija (Urvashi) and her daughter Varada, essayed by Nikhila Vimal, along with her brother Venu (Prem Kumar) visit the temple and stay at the lodge. The predictability begins here as circumstances make Aravindan and Varada close friends.


Realising the life story of Aravindan, Varada starts her quest for finding his mother, who abandoned the seven-year-old boy in the crowd during a festival season. Rajesh Raghavan's screenplay navigates through familiar terrains hinging on the hammy element of the plot. In some parts, the humor appears to be a forcefully added factor to sustain the feel-good milieu.


There is no sufficient delineation of the character Madhavan whereas the focus is on Aravindan and his personal woes. Vineeth neatly presents the distinct emotional phases of the character with elan. Nikhila plays a vital part in the film as a classical dancer, who yearns to be the disciple of famous danseuse Janaki Subramaniam (Sreejaya). She exudes a matured performance with charm and grace as demanded by the role.


Swaroop Philip captures scenic visuals of Kudajadri and nearby areas that leave you mesmerized. The freshness in the premise lends enough support to the film at a stage when you start to feel the vacuum. Though predictable and trite, this film is elevated by the soul of the emotional bond between a son and a mother. Sentimental at times with a feel good feel 'Aravindante Athidhikal' starts as light and innocuous fun before heading to the sentimental conflict zone.



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