Savari Malayalam Movie Review

Feature Film
Despite its slipshod making, 'Savari' survives solely due to the impressive performance by Suraj Venjaramoodu. The eponymous character helps extend the lifeline of the plot by trying to overcome the tedious narration.
Jul 21, 2018 By K. R. Rejeesh

When everything falls like ninepins, only the protagonist survives! This would be the first impression you might get after watching "Savari." The hero appears as a 'marginalised' man only because of his gullible nature and childlike innocence amidst a section of selfish folks. First-time director Asok Nair hinges on the peculiar mannerisms and selfless deeds of the protagonist to drive home a message. The intention is good but the time to reach to the point in the tale is scarcely used effectively.


Set in Thrissur, the whole action of "Savari" takes place in the milieu of Thrissur Pooram. Suraj Venjaramoodu appears as a middle-aged man named Savari, who does odd jobs for a living. He gets a meagre amount as wage from his masters, ranging from tea shop owner and bus drivers to police officer. Early in the morning, he arrives in the city on his bicycle to distribute newspapers and milk to the houses in a colony. Then he runs errands all day for other people without bargaining about his reward.


Savari is very reticent and calm, and there is no reference about his family. He has an emotional attachment to his lone possession, an old rusty bicycle. Savari takes extra care for his bicycle as he never forgets to lock it with a long chain whenever he alights from it. His innocence is exploited by the people around him but he has no complaint. The way Savari uses his earnings makes others lower their heads. Pooram organising heads--- Venu Menon (Jayaraj Warrier) and Unni Mash (Sivaji Guruvayur)-rely on Savari for small needs and he works for them tirelessly.


Suraj is an exception in his performance though he has very few dialogues to express the worries of the character. So it's the body language and mien matters the most to depict the hapless individual. Savari is an epitome of loyalty and he is obedient to follow any order. With his overwhelming portrayal alone the film makes progress but aimlessly.


Savari gets sympathy from tea shop owner Varghese, played by Chembil Ashokan, and flower vendor Ashok (Harisanth). Apart from the routine life of Savari, the director skimps on the elaboration of the plot and the premise. To make matters worse, the dragging latter half also acts as the spoilsport.


Despite its slipshod making, "Savari" survives solely due to the impressive performance by Suraj. The eponymous character helps extend the lifeline of the plot by trying to overcome the tedious narration.

K. R. Rejeesh

   

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