Aickarakkonathe Bhishaguaranmaar Review

First time director Biju Majeed maintains a balancing act in portraying the commercialisation of the health sector and the emotional dilemma of the practitioner of an ancient medicinal system in 'Aikkarakkonathe Bhishagwaranmar.' Biju's storytelling is somewhat outdated and solely touches on peripheral layers of the conflict. Acted by a number of newcomers and set in a countryside, the film puts forward a grave topic but it fails to soar itself from the terrains of a mediocre soap opera drama.


The dual purpose of 'Aikkarakkonathe Bhishagwaranmar' is to highlight the unethical practices in the medical field as well as the healing power of Ayurveda. While the former gets a realistic presentation, the latter becomes an issue of conflict in a family.


There are voices of dissent within the family of famous Ayurveda practitioner Sukumaran Vaidyar (Sivaji Guruvayur) in following this traditional and age-old treatment system for free of cost. Even his elder sonSusruthan (Samarth Ambujakshan), who has a degree in Ayurveda (BAMS), is against his father's generosity in cashless treatment.


Sinseer Mohammed Koya plays Vedavyasan, the second son of Sukumaran. Despite being a homoeopath, he is yet to start his practice. Sukumaran is frustrated by the unfussy attitude of his sons. His daughter Anandavalli (Miyasree Soumya) is a nurse in a private hospital owned by greedy businessman Pushkaran, played by Sunil Sukhada. The manager of an Ayurveda treatment centre, Hariprasad (Vipin Mangalassery), is very close to Anandavalli. He follows the real sanctity and essence of Ayurveda in the centre.


Sivaji Guruvayur, who is the protagonist, is supreme in his performance with an exhilarating portrayal of the emotions. Sukumaran tries to hold firmly the age-old practice of medicinal treatment and its sanctity amidst his struggle to keep the wobbling bond of his family intact. The events that lead to the conflict in the film lack clarity and sharpness, bringing down the seriousness of the situation.


Jafar Idukki's Lalappan is strikingly cunning but too much farcical shade to the character appears to be incongruous. Scripted byShibu Raj. K, the love affairs in the plot especially between Susruthan and Pushkaran's daughter Indukala (Hridya) appear as forcefully squeezed elements. Couple of songs penned by Sohan Roy and composed by B.R. Biju are really appealing. P.C. Lal's visuals are also noteworthy.


Despite having the clear intention of discussing a grave issue,'Aikkarakkonathe Bhishagwaranmar' fails to raise the bar in its execution. Sivaji Guruvayur shines as Sukumaran Vaidyar even as this melodrama, enacted by mostly newcomers, flames out with a slender impact.

Despite having the clear intention of discussing a grave issue,'Aikkarakkonathe Bhishagwaranmar' fails to raise the bar in its execution. Sivaji Guruvayur shines as Sukumaran Vaidyar even as this melodrama, enacted by mostly newcomers, flames out with a slender impact. (2.3) - K. R. Rejeesh

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