Manoharam Malayalam Movie Review

Feature Film | U | Comedy, Drama
It's a question of survival for poster artist Manu in the digital age, and 'Manoharam' narrates his dilemma in coping with it. A feel-good movie with waves of positive thoughts, its neat package and freshness in the presentation compensate the farfetched concepts in decisive moments.
Sep 29, 2019 By K. R. Rejeesh

Here, the hero is professionally marginalized in the digital age and survival is the biggest question before him. Vineeth Sreenivasan, who plays Manoharan aka Manu, is a poster artist in 'Manoharam,' which marks the second directorial of writer-director Anvar Sadiq of 'Ormayundo Ee Mukham' fame. Manu finds it difficult to get orders for making posters or painting advertisement boards with the digital technology penetrates in the field.


With a relevant theme in hand, Anvar presents it in a refreshing manner in the rustic milieu. The fluctuating visuals right from the outset are notable for their efforts to convey the premise of each scene effectively.


The plot never leaves you in dismay except in the portion where the turning point happens. It is a tad unconvincing area and Anvar could have applied some diligence in finding the smooth passage for the protagonist, who is inept in technology like digital printing. Having said that 'Manoharam' accomplishes its mission of contributing the feel-good effect.


A talented painter since his childhood, Manu follows his father's footsteps and he is active in the field till the advent of technology like photoshop. His friend Prabhu (Basil Joseph) forces him to learn photoshop from a computer centre where Manu meets his teacher Sreeja (Aparna Das). Manu is often ridiculed by Rahul (Deepak Parambol), who is a techie, for his inability to cope with the latest technology.


Following the advice of Prabhu and his well-wisher Varghese (Indrans), Manu decides to start a digital printing shop. But his problems never cease to end there. Vineeth is the right choice for the character, and he perfectly emotes the disappointment and small joys of village youth. Albeit it's a typical character, there is a novelty in the situation he is mired in. Set in a village, Chittilancheri, in Palakkad, Manu's aspirations are quite often hindered by his uncle Prabhakaran (Hareesh Peradi), a shop owner.


It's a question of survival for Manu in the digital age, and 'Manoharam' narrates his dilemma in coping with it. It is a feel-good movie with waves of positive thoughts. Neat package and freshness in the presentation compensate its farfetched concepts in decisive moments. One may call the host of flashing visuals quirky but they gift a charming freshness to the flick. Cinematographer Jebin Jacob clearly makes his frames handsomely find a place in the visual sense of viewers.

K. R. Rejeesh

   

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