Roudram Malayalam Movie

Feature Film | 2008 | Action, Drama
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Feb 2, 2008 By Veeyen

'Roudram' is a whopper of an action saga that could best be termed a rapid-fire round of passion, fervor and agility! This adrenaline-boosting flick, despite its immense running time, delivers the punch with a knockout zest that just cannot be denied.



Assistant Commissioner Narendran (Mammootty) lives up to his highly volatile repute and a blazing nickname Nari, courtesy his gallant modes of conduct. When a local ganja dealer is found run over by a truck, the head of bureaucracy sees it as an apt opportunity to settle a few long pending accounts with the narcotic mafia that has been wreaking havoc all over. Entrusted with the murder investigation, Narendran does not think twice before getting caught up in a fierce tussle with the heavyweight baddies Sethu (Sai Kumar) and Appachayi (Vijaya Raghavan), who are determined to see to it at any cost, that justice would not prevail.



Renji Panicker's 'Roudram' is a film that could be laden by prejudices with regard to the kind of implications that it attempts to propagate. That it remains yet another entrant to the over popularized cop genre of films could not have helped much either. Despite these probable setbacks, the film unleashes a tremendous fury that's all encompassing and doesn't offer you much occasion to reflect. In the flurry of events that transpire, you lose breath and flow along, trounced by the might of it all. Renji's pen leisurely borrows from a plethora of events that had recently been severely scrutinized and aims its barbs straight at the CM, when not sternly condemning the legendary plummet in genuineness in the Communist ideology of the state.



Women in Renji Panikker's films can readily be categorized into three - the devotedly doting, the miserably downtrodden and the seductively vamps. Raudram has its share of these three as well; each sticking to its particular mould with a devoted conventionality that simply refuses to budge. In a tremendously male dominated scenario they have little to do, except linger around adding that faint touch of gloss to an otherwise coarse backdrop. Their words and actions invariably lie linked and subjugated to the manpower that's shamelessly flaunted, irrespective of their professional prowess or individuality.



'Roudram' is a classic instance of the actor towering over the film. Mammootty as Narendran is nothing short of dynamite. This is a tailor made role for the fine actor, and as the suave officer with a powerful fist he's on a royal rampage. The flare-ups are real scorching and the blistering heat gets a tad too lethal. It's not a surprise, that the verbal tirade that Renji has cooked up assumes a colossal clout when dynamically mouthed by the protagonist. The debutante Manju - real effervescent, gracefully composed and infinitely charming - who would very easily qualify as Mammooty's best heroine in ages, equally impresses me.



Sai Kumar as the anti-hero deserves as special a mention as the hero himself. It's no wonder then that he's so spectacularly introduced on screen; the deadly charisma that this gem of an actor generates is truly remarkable. The kind of arrogance and haughtiness that rampantly sparks off his fuming form endows villainy with an even worse name.



The technical flamboyance and flair that 'Roudram' puts on show can positively be attributed to Sanjeev Shankar's stunning cinematography that throws in striking close-ups along side a host of other visual delights. Don Max works miracles with his slick editing yet again and together they work up an ambience that's truly chic.



Renji's fiery script has all the customary ingredients of a powerful blast in ample doses. And explode, it does! It just cannot be denied however, that the layout gets more tiring with each film. It has been quite a few years since 'Thalasthanam', and yet there have been very few deviations in pattern and design. And hence despite the fabulous fireworks, the obviousness that pervades all over plays extinguis

Veeyen

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