Sharafat Gayi Tel Lene Hindi Movie Review

Jan 16, 2015 By Mansha Rastogi

You know there's hardly much you can expect from a film that has Zayed Khan in it. It's not us depicting the hopelessness of the film that stars him, it's his track record which has been nothing but a damp squib over the last few years. The actor however, takes yet another plunge with Sharaafat Gayi Tel lene and despite getting his ex brother-in-law Hrithik Roshan to attend every media event for him in a bid to get some publicity, barely manages to make any noise. With the movie finally seeing the light of the day, we tell you whether it's worth your time or not.


Meet the nerdy Prithvi Khurana (Zayed Khan) and his sloppy room mate Sam (Rannvijay). Theirs would have been the routine life of two unremarkable never-beens if it wasn't for the windfall in Prithvi's ATM account. Like a bolt from the blue, Prithvi gets heaps of unaccountable money in his account but little does he know that it's from none other than a dreaded gangster. How his life takes a 360 degree spin after this incident is what follows through the rest of the plot.


Gurmmeet Singh had earlier courted quirkiness in "What The Fish" where the concept of Dimple Kapadia's well-appointed residence being taken over by various eccentric characters generated some humour. In "Sharafat Gayi Tel Lene" the voice of Dawood (yes, the voice plays a pivotal part) plays the same part as the residence in "What The Fish". But in a bid to be quirky yet again, filmmaker Gurmeet Sethi ends up with a wishy-washy of a plot that is neither satirical nor intriguing.


It's not just the direction, even the cinematography and editing of the film is quite shoddy. The least said about the music of the film the better. Right from the background score to the songs, everything musical about the film is ear splitting or plain boring.


Both Zayed Khan and Rannvijay Singh act amateurishly almost to the point of hamming but one can't blame them when the director itself appears clueless. Tina Desai too barely adds any value to the film. Director Gurmeet Sethi gets only one thing right and tha't's the duration of the film. About an hour and a quarter long, the movie ends before it begins to bore you to death.


With a sketchy narrative, unimaginative screenplay and apology of performances, Sharaafat Gayi Tel Lene barely has any merits to shout out for a pleasant watch at the theaters.


With a sketchy narrative, unimaginative screenplay and apology of performances, Sharaafat Gayi Tel Lene barely has any merits to shout out for a pleasant watch at the theaters.
Rating: 3.3 / 10
Mansha Rastogi

   

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