Eetti Tamil Movie Review

Feature Film | U
Eetti has a mundane screenplay but Ravi Arasu has dealt it efficiently without any blatant manipulations which makes the film a worthy, one-time watch.
  Fairly Good
Dec 11, 2015 By SMK

Director Ravi Arasu, a former assistant of Vetrimaaran, has made his debut in a really convenient fashion in Eetti. Just like the twists and coincidences he has managed to throw in the screenplay within spitting distance of his characters. Rare medical disorders have been explored and employed to good use in Tamil cinema in a handful of notable films including the highly popular Ghajini where AR Murugadoss took a leaf from Christopher Nolan's Memento and brought into play the short term memory loss. In Eetti, Ravi Arasu has taken stock of bleeding disorder called Thrombasthenia which is caused by the abnormal count of blood platelets. In Eetti, our hero Pughazhendhi (Atharvaa) suffers from this rare disorder that would cost his life even if he gets a minor injury.


Otherwise, Pugazh is a wizardry hurdler who likes to outperform himself every time he gets on the track. His benchmark is always the previous record he set on the field. When he clocks the national level record time in a local hurdling competition, he gears up to participate in the countrywide meet in Chennai. He gets naturally excited to head to Chennai since he will finally get a chance to meet Gayathri (Sri Divya), with whom he has been flirting over phone for a long time from Tanjore. The uninteresting romance sequences between the leads offer viewers nothing but a completely dispiriting experience. Even the comedy sequences between Aadukalam Murugadoss and Atharvaa fall short of expectations and never pan out as one hoped.


The slackened pace of the screenplay gathers steam when the story shifts to Chennai where Pugazh is entangled in a crime case on illegal printing and marketing of fake currency by a underworld mafia headed by RNR Manohar, who delivers a brilliant performance as a menacing antagonist with pitch-perfect voice modulation and sheer badass attitude.


Atharvaa is an apt choice for the role of a hurdler and does complete justice to his character with his beefed-up physique and athletic energy. His sparkling performance is much better than most of his films and one would easily rate this as his second best after Bala's Paradesi. Sri Divya, however, has nothing much to do but she doesn't make us frown either.


Toting up, Eetti has a mundane screenplay but Ravi Arasu has dealt it efficiently without any blatant manipulations which makes the film a worthy, one-time watch.


  Fairly Good
SMK

   

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