Oruvan Review

Debutante director Vinu Anand's Oruvan tells in a convincing and rather well-etched out manner the story of Sivan, a psychopath, but the film turns out to be one that doesn't remain in your minds once you leave the theatres. The performances by almost all the main actors are convincing, and the technical aspects too are handled fairly well, but Oruvan is not the kind of film that would find place among your favourite ones.



Sivan, a psychopath who falls in the hands of the public, escapes from their custody and on being chased, jumps into a river. He is found in a severely wounded condition by Bharathan, who makes fire-crackers and conducts fireworks at temple festivals. Bharathan, who is on his way back home with his associates Velu and Balan, takes Sivan to his house and nurses him back to health. Sivan becomes a part of his family which consists of his wife Jaya and three daughters, and in course of time becomes his right-hand man in the fireworks business.


But Sivan has an air of mystery surrounding him and behaves strangely at times. The psychopath in him doesn't remain idle. He targets the village harlot and kills her. And then his next victim is Ravi, who is Velu's nephew and happens to be rather inquisitive, making inquiries about Sivan and his whereabouts. He kills Ravi and dumps his body in a marsh, so that nobody even gets to know about his fate. But then, Sivan has something bigger, something more dreadful in his mind. And when that is executed, all hell breaks loose.


Indrajith as Sivan does his job excellently. Lal as Bharathan too does justice to his role. But Meera Vasudev doesn't seem comfortable in her role as Jaya, Bharathan's wife. Prithviraj as the young police officer Jeevan is his usual self, while all others in the cast are OK. Of the songs, "Kuyilukale…" and "Kannipenney…" jell with the subject and have been shot rather well. Jibu Jacob's cinematography is good. Ranjan Abraham has rendered able support with his editing and so has Joseph Nellickal with his art-work. Reji Nair's script too is good.


But there still is something lacking that makes the film an average one, though well-made. That something perhaps concerns the pace of the film or its setting and packaging. Be that as it may, director Vinu Anand and his team must be appreciated for having ventured to make a rather different kind of a movie with a very striking end, and that too in a fairly good manner for a maiden venture.


Debutante director Vinu Anand's Oruvan tells in a convincing and rather well-etched out manner the story of Sivan, a psychopath, but the film turns out to be one that doesn't remain in your minds once you leave the theatres. (2) - Unni Nair

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