Varanam Aayiram Tamil Movie Review

Feature Film | Drama, Family
Vaararam Aayiram' depicts the extraordinary bond of relationship between father and son. To an extent, it is autobiographical but cinematic license has been taken to make it an entertainer. As Gautham himself admitted, it is a tribute to fathers.
Nov 21, 2008 By PVS

Gautham Mennon, acclaimed master story-teller, used all his ingenuity and creativity to craft this film. It appeals not for its clever plot or wit but for its ordinariness. But this ordinariness may not appeal to all. "Vaararam Aayiram" depicts the extraordinary bond of relationship between father and son. To an extent, it is autobiographical but cinematic license has been taken to make it an entertainer. As Gautham himself admitted, it is a tribute to fathers.


The story begins with a 60-year-old Krishnan (Surya), getting his hair trimmed in a saloon. He dies from throat cancer on reaching home. The news is conveyed to his son, Major Surya (Surya) who is on his way on a rescue mission. Remembering his father's advice that life should go on irrespective of whatever happens, Surya decides to go ahead with his mission but he is overwhelmed by emotions. In a flashback Surya goes down memory lane. He reflects on his metamorphosis from childhood to adulthood.


Constantly moving back and forth from the past to the present, the film is a compelling look at the forces that guide one's life and the life's journey that one makes.


Right from his childhood, Surya (Surya) develops an admiration for his father and he considers his father a hero, an icon from whom he draws inspiration. He wants to emulate his father in all walks of his life.


His father Krishnan, without being preachy, imparts important human values to his son. As Surya grows up, Krishnan plays a meaningful and important role - making Surya a man of character and courage.


Surya's rise comes not as a result of a grand plan or ambition but as a result of his responses to a series of challenging circumstances that arise as his life unfolds, his father being his guiding force. His real test is that when Surya meets Megna (Sameera Reddy) on a night train and falls madly in love with her. In his efforts to woo her, he even follows her even to US and eventually wins her heart. But she dies in a bomb attack. Here his life takes a tumble. Surya goes wayward and takes to drugs and drinking. How he overcomes his problems and finds his true self and life's charm are narrated in the remaining part of the story.


Surya bears the burden of the story's emotional and psychological baggage. As an adolescent he bubbles with energy; as an adult he portrays the inner-scars beneath the tough-guy exterior with sensitivity; and as a father he turns in a mature performance. For the most part, Surya is at his best.


Supporting casts Simran as mother, Divya Spandana with the girl next-door looks, and Sameera Reddy with cool exuberance are equally effective and keep up the momentum.


Others powering the movie from behind the scenes are music director Harris Jayaraj, whose background score and renditions rock throughout. The songs especially, "Adiye Kolluthe" and "Nenjukkul Peidhidum" are smash hits with the viewers. Cinematographer Rathnavelu's amazing visuals style the film's aesthetics. Art director Rajeevan's period settings and costumes make the viewers feel they are on the journey.


The film which takes off on a high note loses steam in the second half. It drags on for three hours leaving the audience tired and exhausted.


PVS

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