Nervarennu Immni Cherinjoo..tta Review

The purpose of making a statement is satisfyingly accomplished by this bizarrely titled film with low-key settings. Perhaps, this is the first time 'Pulikali' (a recreational folk art in which people disguise themselves as tigers) becomes the backdrop of a movie. 'Nervarennu Immani Cherinjoo...Ttaa..' is obviously a distinct attempt by director Mani Madhav. True to the title, his script evokes the vibes of standalone factors albeit the major conflict is barely free from familiar situations.


A sort of perplexing approach by the director causes the intrusion of some unnecessary sequences while police officer Alex (Kalabhavan Shajon) unofficially investigates the disappearance of Prakashan (Anandhu Shaji). Alex, who is in the guise of a journalist, probes the case by visiting the village and then talks to the people, who are close to Prakashan, a 'Pulikali' artiste. Lack of consistency is palpable in several places instead of observing a grave approach. The major events happen on a single day in a village in Thrissur where Alex is accompanied by his teenage daughter.


The tale is unfolded through the description of others about Prakashan, who reaches in that village with a group of 'Pulikali' artistes to perform there. In fact, his beloved Surabhi, played by Pratheeksha. G. Pradeep, is a native of that place. Alex gets the initial information about Prakashan from his teammate Kunju (Nobi). Prakashan cements his place in the 'Pulikali' troupe with the help of his friend Vishnu (Kalabhavan Jinto).


When Alex meets Sivan (Jaffar Idukki), a friend of Surabhi's brother Suresh (Sudhi Koppa), the real cause of Prakashan's disappearance is revealed. Sudhi Koppa's dazzling act adds extra charm to the climax scenes that are filled with beautiful tropes. From the outset, Alex's daughter is seen in a karate student's attire and it conveys a lot once you realize the real intention of 'Nervarennu Immani Cherinjoo...Ttaa..'


It's Mani Madhav's different interpretation makes the plot interesting despite the slipshod narration in certain parts. The riveting backdrop of 'Pulikali' is the backbone of this film with a clear social statement. Packaged in Thrissur dialect, it has fits and starts in the treatment with minimal settings. One would sincerely wish that certain order had prevailed in the unravelling of incidents behind the disappearance of a youth to make it more powerful and impressive.


A subdued investigative treatment is given to the narration but it effuses more traits of a family drama than a thriller in the company of attractive visuals by Harilal. It's not a compact investigative tale as the typical blaring BGM and racy shots are hard to come by. Newcomers showcase reliable performances while Jaffar Idukki appears natural as a toddy seller.


The film scores wonderfully while unwinding its politics about a social issue sans any loud remarks. Instead, the visuals in the prologue elegantly converse the purpose. At that stage, you would pine for an emphatic and revised touch to the former portions of this flick. It certainly slopes slightly from the straight line of conventional narration but the impact comes a little too late.

The riveting backdrop of 'Pulikali' is the backbone of this film with a clear social statement. Packaged in Thrissur dialect, 'Nervarennu Immani Cherinjoo...Ttaa..' has fits and starts in the treatment with minimal settings. One would sincerely wish that certain order had prevailed in the unravelling of incidents behind the disappearance of a youth to make it more powerful and impressive. (2.5) - K. R. Rejeesh


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