Anveshanam Malayalam Movie Review

Feature Film | U | Family, Thriller
Anveshanam' is an emotional thriller with a simple tale that happens in a night. In the conflict sets in a hospital, parenting and medical issues come to the fore. Despite the lack of pep up moments, it is a decent attempt to depict a relevant topic.
Feb 1, 2020 By K. R. Rejeesh

SHOWTIMES: INDIA  

The decibel level required for the treatment of a thriller is mediocre in Jayasurya starrer 'Anveshanam' but newbie director Prasobh Vijayan makes an emphatic statement here. Though it's subtle and devoid of didactic elements, the theme exposes harsh realities at times of panic situations. Parenting and medical issues find room in the script penned by Ranjeet Kamala Sankar, Francis Thomas and Salil. V, who maintain a constraint in the tale sans overstretching the plot that occurs in a night at a hospital.


Jayasurya is a media personality, Aravindan, in 'Anveshanam', and he lives in an apartment with his wife Kavitha (Sruthi Ramachandran) and two children. One evening, his son Aswin (Asuthosh) is found unconscious on the floor. She took him to hospital, where their family friend Dr Gautham (Vijay Babu) is practising. Dr Ashok Kumar (Srikanth Murali) treats the boy but the finding of nursing superintendent Sony Cheriyan (Lena) makes things worse. Police officers arrive at the hospital and they investigate the case to solve the mystery behind the boy's condition.


Jayasurya effortlessly showcases his temperament in judging the emotional conflict of a devastated father in the face of a tragedy. As a parent, Aravind is indulgent and attached to his children. His anguish and distress are aptly conveyed through Jayasurya. Sruthy, who is seen in a meaty role for the first time, is exquisite enough to exude the pinnacle of agony which a mother is experiencing. Leona Lishoy plays ACP Latha, who is a pregnant woman, is like a trope meant for the viewer to learn a lesson from the boy's incident, and it's an experience for Latha with regard to parenting as she herself investigates the case.


The mystery is generated through the panic expressions of the performers, making ample room for suspecting each one of them. The altogether cover-up drama is the tension-triggering area in the film. As a director, Prasobh scores in this part by letting our imagination go wild. But once problem-solving episode crops up, some vagueness is felt in the narration, which, otherwise, is sensible in other parts.


The flick is an emotional thriller with a simple tale that happens in a night. In the conflict sets in a hospital, parenting and medical issues come to the fore. Despite the lack of pep up moments, it is a decent attempt to depict a relevant topic.


Music by Jakes Bejoy complements with the pace of 'Anveshanam', which has well-trimmed sequences by editor Appu Bhattathiri. The two-hour-long length is perfect for the narration. The prologue and epilogue have a similar frame with the initial aerial shot gradually zooms into a high-rise apartment in the city while the final shot shows the camera moving away from the building. Cinematographer Sujith Vassudev, who has also done the character Prathap in the film, gives quality visuals that are mostly shot indoors.

K. R. Rejeesh

   

USER REVIEWS
Aishwa

3*** is too much. First time Now running disappointed. Nothing special. Superficial thriller. Very weak story base...wea... Show more
3*** is too much. First time Now running disappointed. Nothing special. Superficial thriller. Very weak story base...weakest script. Finally what the director wants to tell...only God knows. Shouldn't have released now along with Anjaam pathira & psycho
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